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June 06, 2020

Comments

KC

Oh. Oh dear.

Can you do fruity herbal iced teas? I would say "surely the grocery delivery company can't screw that up" and yet I know that they could. But, like, *probably* they could get Stash mango-passionfruit (while it tastes absolutely nothing like mango-passionfruit - I don't have the foggiest idea why they named it that) and it is really quite good and also caffeine free (for Celestial Seasonings, my favorite is the Tangerine Zinger). (note: both teas - most "fruity" herbal teas, really - are predominately hibiscus, which lowers blood pressure, so be aware of that, especially when drinking in quantity)

There's also lemonade? Or Tang, I guess.

I hope the planter turned out well!

TheQueen

KC - oh, the planter is a multi week project. And you reminded me that I have decaf tea that I could hav shot instead of coffee or I could make it into cold iced tea!

KC

Decaf tea, whether hot or iced, definitely sounds better to me than milk-and-water, anyway! (really, anything, including milk *or* water, sounds better than milk and water...)

But yes. It sounds like your body has Definite Opinions in regards to caffeine, and that it would likely be for the best to cooperate with those.

I think the planters I have seen being built were fairly basic and constructed, most often, from pre-cut materials, but I could well imagine a Longer Term Planter Project. :-)

TheQueen

KC - adapting this so it can roll and spin:
https://www.mrstacky.com/#*
- because those that do (and have a composter) cost hundreds of dollars more, which is crazy.

KC

Oh, wow. That looks lovely, and also like a ton of fun, but I have no idea how you are going to work composting into it?

(you would be so phenomenally unimpressed with our gardening this year. We mulched part of the back lawn with cardboard boxes and paper bags, and that mulch is weighted down with just about everything [a juice bottle of water? yep. A lone cinderblock? yep. Chunks of lawn removed where plants were put? yep. giant vitamin bottles filled with water? yep.]. Attractive it is not, but 1. it is in the back yard and 2. we now have zucchinis growing out there to supplement our once-every-three-weeks grocery delivery orders, with pretty minimal work compared to digging/tilling a regular garden and weeding it, or compared to building a raised-bed garden, and we can decide next year whether to "dig in" further to engaged gardening or let the lawn grow back over the bits we used this year, so... yeah. Instagram-worthy it ain't.)

TheQueen

KC - oh, there will be no composting. That was the trade-off for not paying the hundreds of dollars. That, and having to put it on wheels myself.

KC

I think I'd rather have my composting going on separately anyway - when multi-function devices have all their functions closely related, then that's great - but when *one* part of the thing breaking down means that the whole thing is semi-trash, then I am not a fan. And when composting goes bad, it can go *really* bad.

But yes! Having to put your own wheels on seems like it would be rather better than paying hundreds of dollars!

TheQueen

Kc - mom had epic piles of compost in her yard. What we have in our yard are raccoons. They would just eat the compost if it was food in any way.

KC

But they have peanuts? I have a hard time envisioning digging through a compost bin for most household discards if you've got peanuts, although I suppose the diet would get monotonous and a raccoon has less aversion to digging through compost than I do.

TheQueen

KC - but they do. It’s so odd. They have three types of protein, but still their scavenger nature takes over. I think it’s like a cat -no matter how much cat food you lay out they show up with dead birds on your porch.

KC

Well, dead birds are for entertainment and exercise, less for dietary intake?

But yeah. Scavengers gonna scavenge, I guess, so no unlocked compost pile for you. (at a community garden years ago, they ended up having to lock their composter because people from the surrounding community were *coming to steal compost* which is frankly really bizarre given how wealthy the neighbors of the community garden were, but *shrug* - entitled people gonna take resources that don't belong to them, even if it's compost, I guess.)

TheQueen

KC - that is odd. Maybe they saw it as trash, like they way people would take something left at the curb for the trash truck.

KC

Yeah, if "these resources are for the community garden only" signs hadn't been posted, I'd agree? (to be fair, I think the signs were posted *after* the first round of compost-swipers, who may have been entirely charitable and thought that surely we were collectively producing more compost than we could use and thus they would help us out by hauling some of it away. And the second-and-onwards sets may have heard about it from the first compost-swipers and thus either not been actually *looking* at posted signs or might have been on the "eh, we're already here, we're not taking *that* much, it's no worse than first-compost-swiper" sort of mental front.)

But you had to go about a block off the street and past the community garden shed to get to the compost. So not exactly curbside!

Or maybe the compost swipers were all illiterate.

(as a fenced-in graduate student housing island in the middle of an extremely rich neighborhood, we had a mix of neighbor interactions - some neighbors felt we were a Blight and a Menace for behold we were Poor People in Dense Housing [albeit with our own parking, so we weren't using up any of "their" street parking? and not much noise? and impecunious graduate students are *really* not the same profile that comes to mind in general for low-income neighborhoods...] and they kept writing letters to the editor and such, but lots of neighbors used our network of sidewalks as a portion of their walking or power-walking [rich neighborhoods: often no sidewalks, so you have to walk on the streets - but it also occurs to me that we had a community building *with a bathroom* and this may have made us a useful halfway-point destination for groups of older women out for longer walks? Although they'd have had to talk a resident into letting them in/sharing the code, so I'm not sure.]. Anyway, I was one street farther "in" to the housing than the community building, and we regularly had individuals or sets of perfectly-coiffed older women in designer tracksuits [or, sometimes, older married couples] stopping and admiring our flower garden, especially during tulip time [sometimes I'd see them out the window as they stopped and pointed and photographed things; occasionally I'd be out there yanking weeds as they went by and they'd compliment me and ask about this or that], and they petted peoples' dogs and cooed over local babies and toddlers and stuff)(the assorted compost swipers were reported to be all 30-50, though, and in yoga clothes/jeans, so presumably not overlapping with the walking/powerwalking crew, unless the latter were somehow an Advance Guard for the Compost Crime Spree people, but I doubt it?)

That said: we were probably half an hour's drive closer than the nearest big box home improvement store, so if you *really* wanted to get that whatever-it-is that was delivered to your door into its giant decorative pot this afternoon, I could see someone making an argument that making compost doesn't cost anything, so it's free, so they can have it, at least just enough to finish their project...

TheQueen

KC - It might be that someone interpreted the “community” in community garden as the global community?

KC

Yeah. I'm... not sure why there would be signs, unless they were Very Positive looking signs, if global community...

I guess, maybe someone interpreted the signs with "community" meaning "zip code" and therefore assumed someone was driving in from some Bad Inner City Neighborhood to steal compost?

That said, the compost swipers were also reported to be looking oddly furtive, which is why they attracted attention to begin with (because normally, if someone is putting compost into a container, one just assumes that they'll be then hauling it around to the gate in the deer-proof 10' tall fence and dragging it to their garden, whereas instead these people were taking it out to their fancy cars and driving away...). But maybe upper-class people transferring compost will look furtive no matter what, since this is a Menial Occupation and they are not in their Nice Clothes? I don't know.

TheQueen

KC - mysterious. In Saint Louis we have a problem with people stealing bricks after a home is destroyed or burned down. Oftentimes people in fancy cars.

KC

Well, the bricks with maker's marks on them are gold for high-end landscaping and for high-end artistic decorating as "local color" - so, yeah, that makes sense. It's nuts, though: it is still stealing, y'all. Just because the locals "don't adequately appreciate" the bricks doesn't mean it's not stealing.

TheQueen

KC - I suppose people think it’s trash that has to be hauled away, and why not take it? Same way with copper pipes.

KC

The thing is, if it's definitely-not-trash to them, then... how do you justify saying that it must be trash to the owner?

(as with copper pipes! I mean, that's cash in the bank and I don't think anyone is unaware that you can get $/pound for them?)

TheQueen

KC - I’m not justifying it. Just pointing out the thought pattern.

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